The Bread is in the Baking

Rikki Wynn - Baker and actor, currently living in Portland, OR.

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Question or comments about the cooking?

Hello, lovely wonderful followers.

Thank you so much for sticking with me through the spell of no posts. I wish I was posting to say that this was going to change… but it probably won’t. I’ll try to start posting recipes at least once a month soon, but my new job makes it a little hard because a lot of the recipes I would post here are now being used in the restaurant.

After getting back from Ireland (check the post before this one for the travel blog), I immediately got a job working at Bridgeport Brewery! I am now one of two bakers for the brewpub. I help make most of the bread served in the restaurant and get to make (almost) whatever I want for the dessert menu. It’s honestly the best job I’ve ever had. I feel like I’m learning a lot here and I get to work with some amazing people.

These pictures are of just a few things I’ve made since I started a little over two months ago:

1. Carrot, walnut and coconut cake with cream cheese icing

2. Fresh strawberry tart with vanilla pastry cream and rhubarb glaze

3. Coconut macaroons

4. Vanilla almond cake with blackberry jam center and brown sugar buttermilk swiss buttercream

5. Chocolate cake with chocolate chips and chocolate swiss buttercream

6. Strawberry Rhubarb ramekin pies

7. Strawberry rhubarb and blueberry basil mini flag pies (this recipe is actually on my blog here from last summer)

8. Como loafs

July 7, 2014 @ 10:34 PM 3 notes

A few months ago, two of my very dear friends and I went on a fruit picking adventure. We went out to a U-Pick farm on Sauvie Island and picked raspberries, blueberries, cucumbers, green beans and, best of all, peaches.
We were out picking fruit for a good 3 1/2 hours, in the middle of the day. With no sunscreen on. By the time we got to the peaches the three of us were tired, hot, thirsty and my arms were a similar shade to the red blush on the peaches. We started picking peaches and putting them into our cart. I grabbed one, and it was so soft to the touch, I had to bite into it. I bit into it and the peach exploded with sweet floral juices. I shouted for my friends to come over and we passed around the most tasty peach I’ve ever had.
While we waited to pay, we were all coming up with recipes that we had to make with our treasure trove. For the peaches, we decided on ice cream and peach basil jam (to be posted soon).
For the ice cream, we wanted to keep it simple. I voiced my strong feelings toward there not being any vanilla in the ice cream. Vanilla brings out way to much sweetness in the peaches and not enough of the flavor. We chose to make a salted peach ice cream. This would bring out the flavor more and making a frozen custard would make it thick and creamy. We used the amazing Jacobson salt, from the oregon coast and fresh eggs from my chickens. We stayed up till 11pm at night making the ice cream and it was totally worth it. I’ve been hoarding my pint of ice cream in the freezer, only taking a bite or two, hoping it will last forever.
You will need a ice cream maker for this recipe.
Frozen Salted Peach Custard
(makes about 3 pints)
4 lbs fresh peaches, pitted and cut into small pieces
3/4 cup granulated sugar, divided
4 1/2 tsp lemon juice
1 cup heavy cream
6 egg yolks
2 tbs of flakey salt (we used the amazing Jacobson Salt)
In a sauce pan, cook the peaches, lemon juice and half the sugar until the fruit has reduced and easily coats a wooden spoon. Let cool to room temp.
In another sauce pan, bring the cream to a simmer. Whisk the egg yolks and the rest of the sugar together in a small bowl. Once the milk is simmering, take it off the heat, add a small amount of the milk to the egg/sugar mix and quickly whisk together, then add the egg/sugar/milk mixture to the rest of the milk, whisk together, put back on the stove over medium heat and continue to whisk until it thickens into a custard (about 10 minutes). Pour custard into a bowl. Using a food mill, strain the compote into the custard and stir together. Stir in the salt. Place in the fridge until room temp (or colder).
To finish the ice cream, follow the instructions that come with whatever ice cream maker you have. Each one works a little differently.
Let the ice cream set overnight before eating (of course tasting it before you put it in the freezer to set is always encouraged).
Total Time: 4 hours
Please check out my lovely friend, Jon Wash’s website . He and I create this recipe together.. View Larger

A few months ago, two of my very dear friends and I went on a fruit picking adventure. We went out to a U-Pick farm on Sauvie Island and picked raspberries, blueberries, cucumbers, green beans and, best of all, peaches.

We were out picking fruit for a good 3 1/2 hours, in the middle of the day. With no sunscreen on. By the time we got to the peaches the three of us were tired, hot, thirsty and my arms were a similar shade to the red blush on the peaches. We started picking peaches and putting them into our cart. I grabbed one, and it was so soft to the touch, I had to bite into it. I bit into it and the peach exploded with sweet floral juices. I shouted for my friends to come over and we passed around the most tasty peach I’ve ever had.

While we waited to pay, we were all coming up with recipes that we had to make with our treasure trove. For the peaches, we decided on ice cream and peach basil jam (to be posted soon).

For the ice cream, we wanted to keep it simple. I voiced my strong feelings toward there not being any vanilla in the ice cream. Vanilla brings out way to much sweetness in the peaches and not enough of the flavor. We chose to make a salted peach ice cream. This would bring out the flavor more and making a frozen custard would make it thick and creamy. We used the amazing Jacobson salt, from the oregon coast and fresh eggs from my chickens. We stayed up till 11pm at night making the ice cream and it was totally worth it. I’ve been hoarding my pint of ice cream in the freezer, only taking a bite or two, hoping it will last forever.

You will need a ice cream maker for this recipe.

Frozen Salted Peach Custard

(makes about 3 pints)

4 lbs fresh peaches, pitted and cut into small pieces

3/4 cup granulated sugar, divided

4 1/2 tsp lemon juice

1 cup heavy cream

6 egg yolks

2 tbs of flakey salt (we used the amazing Jacobson Salt)

In a sauce pan, cook the peaches, lemon juice and half the sugar until the fruit has reduced and easily coats a wooden spoon. Let cool to room temp.

In another sauce pan, bring the cream to a simmer. Whisk the egg yolks and the rest of the sugar together in a small bowl. Once the milk is simmering, take it off the heat, add a small amount of the milk to the egg/sugar mix and quickly whisk together, then add the egg/sugar/milk mixture to the rest of the milk, whisk together, put back on the stove over medium heat and continue to whisk until it thickens into a custard (about 10 minutes). Pour custard into a bowl. Using a food mill, strain the compote into the custard and stir together. Stir in the salt. Place in the fridge until room temp (or colder).

To finish the ice cream, follow the instructions that come with whatever ice cream maker you have. Each one works a little differently.

Let the ice cream set overnight before eating (of course tasting it before you put it in the freezer to set is always encouraged).

Total Time: 4 hours

Please check out my lovely friend, Jon Wash’s website . He and I create this recipe together..

October 23, 2013 @ 2:19 PM

Happy (day after) 4th of July!
I’ve been moving over the past month. I’m not sure if a slow move is better than the 24 hours get-your-stuff-out-as-fast-as-you-can move. Both are stressful. Anyway, that’s my excuse for the lack of posts in the last month.
But the day before yesterday, I officially moved into my new house! So now I can get back to baking. And just in time for the perfect pie holiday: 4th of July!
I knew that I wanted to make a pie for the BBQ I was going to, but I didn’t want to just make a pie, I wanted to do something a little fun, and an american flag seemed like a good idea.
Now, I had no idea if this would work. I was really worried that once I put the pie in the oven, the blueberries and strawberries would seep together and you wouldn’t see the clear difference between the blue and the red. I almost separated the blueberries with parchment paper! But that seemed a bit extreme, so I just put it in the oven and prayed.
I chose to add basil because I really like sweets with a savory edge. Basil adds a little bit of surprise the end of your bite of pie and goes oh so nicely with the rhubarb.
For pies with intricate designs to work, chilling the pie is key. If you don’t chill the pie, the crust will sag, and your designs won’t look very pretty. Every step is important, but that being said. This pie is very simple to make and will surely be a hit at any BBQ!
4th of July Pie!
Pie Crust
2 1/2 cups (313 grams) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting surfaces
2 tablespoons (25 grams) granulated sugar (doing a little less sugar will make it less cookie-ish)
1 teaspoon (4 grams) table salt
2 sticks (225 grams, 8 ounces, 16 tablespoons or 1 cup) unsalted butter, very cold
1/2 cup (118 ml) vodka or water, if you don’t have vodka
1 egg, beaten, for the egg wash
Filling
3 pints of strawberries, cored and cut into quarters
1 large stalk of rhubarb, cut lengthwise and then chopped into small pieces
1 tbsp finely chopped fresh basil
1 pint of blueberries
3/4 cup cornstarch, divided (1/2 cup for strawberries, 1/4 cup for blueberries)
3/4 cup sugar, divided (1/2 cup for strawberries, 1/4 cup for blueberries)
Juice from half a lemon

Make the pie crust first.
Whisk together flour, sugar and salt in the bottom of a large, wide-ish bowl. Using a pastry blender, two forks or your fingertips, work the butter into the flour until the biggest pieces of butter are the size of small peas. Gently stir in the vodka (or water) with your hands, mixing it until a craggy mass form and then knead it just two or three times to form a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and flatten into a rectangle. Chill in fridge for at least an hour or up to two days. The longer you let it rest, the easier it will be to roll out later.
While the dough is resting, make your fillings!
In one bowl, toss the strawberries, rhubarb and basil, half cup of sugar and half cup of cornstarch together until well combined.
In a second bowl, toss blueberries, 1/4 cup sugar and 1/4 cup cornstarch together until well combined.
Roll out your dough so that it is at least an inch and 1/2 wider on all sides than your pan. Carefully place the dough in the pan, making sure that it lies flat in the bottom and corners of the pan. Cut the excess dough off the edges, roll the excess dough together and place in the fridge to chill.
Pour your strawberries evenly into the pie dough, making sure to leave a rectangle empty in the upper left corner. Then pour the blueberries into the empty corner. Squeeze the half a lemon over the whole pie.
Take your excess dough out of the fridge and roll it into another rectangle, the length of your pan. Using a ruler, cut 3, quarter inch  wide strips of pie dough  and place them evenly across the longest strawberry part of your pie. Then cut 5 more strips to fit the shorter part of your pie. Roll down the pie dough around the edges of the pie to cover the ends of the strips. With any leftover pie dough, cut out stars or hearts to place (artfully) over the blueberries.
Preheat the oven to 400°F and place your pie in the fridge to chill, for at least 20 minutes, while your oven preheats.
Carefully brush the pie dough with the egg wash before placing in the oven.
Bake for about 30-40 minutes or until the pie crust is a golden brown.
Let chill to room temp. before serving.
ENJOY!
Total Time: About 2 hours
NOTE: The amount of berries I used for this pie made a thin 8x12in pie. If I were to do this pie again, I would buy more berries or make a smaller pie.

For more food photos please check out my facebook page! View Larger

Happy (day after) 4th of July!

I’ve been moving over the past month. I’m not sure if a slow move is better than the 24 hours get-your-stuff-out-as-fast-as-you-can move. Both are stressful. Anyway, that’s my excuse for the lack of posts in the last month.

But the day before yesterday, I officially moved into my new house! So now I can get back to baking. And just in time for the perfect pie holiday: 4th of July!

I knew that I wanted to make a pie for the BBQ I was going to, but I didn’t want to just make a pie, I wanted to do something a little fun, and an american flag seemed like a good idea.

Now, I had no idea if this would work. I was really worried that once I put the pie in the oven, the blueberries and strawberries would seep together and you wouldn’t see the clear difference between the blue and the red. I almost separated the blueberries with parchment paper! But that seemed a bit extreme, so I just put it in the oven and prayed.

I chose to add basil because I really like sweets with a savory edge. Basil adds a little bit of surprise the end of your bite of pie and goes oh so nicely with the rhubarb.

For pies with intricate designs to work, chilling the pie is key. If you don’t chill the pie, the crust will sag, and your designs won’t look very pretty. Every step is important, but that being said. This pie is very simple to make and will surely be a hit at any BBQ!

4th of July Pie!

Pie Crust

2 1/2 cups (313 grams) all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting surfaces

2 tablespoons (25 grams) granulated sugar (doing a little less sugar will make it less cookie-ish)

1 teaspoon (4 grams) table salt

2 sticks (225 grams, 8 ounces, 16 tablespoons or 1 cup) unsalted butter, very cold

1/2 cup (118 ml) vodka or water, if you don’t have vodka

1 egg, beaten, for the egg wash

Filling

3 pints of strawberries, cored and cut into quarters

1 large stalk of rhubarb, cut lengthwise and then chopped into small pieces

1 tbsp finely chopped fresh basil

1 pint of blueberries

3/4 cup cornstarch, divided (1/2 cup for strawberries, 1/4 cup for blueberries)

3/4 cup sugar, divided (1/2 cup for strawberries, 1/4 cup for blueberries)

Juice from half a lemon

Make the pie crust first.

Whisk together flour, sugar and salt in the bottom of a large, wide-ish bowl. Using a pastry blender, two forks or your fingertips, work the butter into the flour until the biggest pieces of butter are the size of small peas. Gently stir in the vodka (or water) with your hands, mixing it until a craggy mass form and then knead it just two or three times to form a ball. Wrap in plastic wrap and flatten into a rectangle. Chill in fridge for at least an hour or up to two days. The longer you let it rest, the easier it will be to roll out later.

While the dough is resting, make your fillings!

In one bowl, toss the strawberries, rhubarb and basil, half cup of sugar and half cup of cornstarch together until well combined.

In a second bowl, toss blueberries, 1/4 cup sugar and 1/4 cup cornstarch together until well combined.

Roll out your dough so that it is at least an inch and 1/2 wider on all sides than your pan. Carefully place the dough in the pan, making sure that it lies flat in the bottom and corners of the pan. Cut the excess dough off the edges, roll the excess dough together and place in the fridge to chill.

Pour your strawberries evenly into the pie dough, making sure to leave a rectangle empty in the upper left corner. Then pour the blueberries into the empty corner. Squeeze the half a lemon over the whole pie.

Take your excess dough out of the fridge and roll it into another rectangle, the length of your pan. Using a ruler, cut 3, quarter inch  wide strips of pie dough  and place them evenly across the longest strawberry part of your pie. Then cut 5 more strips to fit the shorter part of your pie. Roll down the pie dough around the edges of the pie to cover the ends of the strips. With any leftover pie dough, cut out stars or hearts to place (artfully) over the blueberries.

Preheat the oven to 400°F and place your pie in the fridge to chill, for at least 20 minutes, while your oven preheats.

Carefully brush the pie dough with the egg wash before placing in the oven.

Bake for about 30-40 minutes or until the pie crust is a golden brown.

Let chill to room temp. before serving.

ENJOY!

Total Time: About 2 hours

NOTE: The amount of berries I used for this pie made a thin 8x12in pie. If I were to do this pie again, I would buy more berries or make a smaller pie.

For more food photos please check out my facebook page!

July 5, 2013 @ 2:24 PM 4 notes

This is a wonderful quick brunch recipe.
While “real” cinnamon rolls need to be started the night before, these can be whipped up quickly right before your guests come! These are denser than cinnamon rolls but they are very tasty and so cute! I made these for a party my house was having, they were a huge hit.
I only made a few changes to this recipe. I whipped the eggs and sugar together for a fluffier dough and I used regular milk instead of half and half for the icing.
Sorry I haven’t been posting as much as I want to (and should)! Lots of awesome stuff happening right now (teaching a class tonight, started at a new bakery!!). I have a couple more recipes to put up and I promise they will be posted soon!
Cinnamon Roll Muffins
(Makes 12 muffins)
Dough1/2 cup packed light brown sugar1 teaspoon baking soda1/2 teaspoon salt1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract1 large egg, at room temperature1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature3 cups all-purpose flour (plus more as needed)Filling3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted1 cup loosely packed light brown sugar1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamonIcing1 cup confectioners’ sugar2 tablespoons milk1/4 teaspoon vanilla extractPreheat oven to 375°F and either grease each muffin well with butter or place a muffin cup in each well.
Whip the brown sugar, vanilla, and the egg in a large bowl until fluffy. Mix in the baking soda and salt, then add the buttermilk and whisk to incorporate. Switch to a rubber spatula, and add the flour to the bowl, mixing until a rough dough comes together. Give the flour a minute to absorb the liquid, then if necessary add additional flour until the dough is soft.
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead the dough for a minute or two, until it is uniform. Roll the dough into a rectangle measuring approximately 12x24-inches. Brush the dough with the melted butter. In a small bowl, stir the brown sugar and cinnamon together. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over the surface of the dough. Starting with a wide side facing you, tightly roll the dough into a log. Cut the log into 12 pieces, 2 inches wide. Place one piece of dough into each well of the prepared muffin pan.Bake the muffins for 15-18 minutes, or until golden brown. Transfer the pan to a wire rack and let the muffins cool for a few minutes then remove them to the rack.While the muffins are baking, make the icing by whisking together the confectioner’s sugar, milk, and vanilla. After the muffins have cooled, drizzle them with the icing and serve warm.
Total Time: About 30 minutes
This lovely picture was taken by Rachel King. For more food photos please check out my facebook page! View Larger


This is a wonderful quick brunch recipe.

While “real” cinnamon rolls need to be started the night before, these can be whipped up quickly right before your guests come! These are denser than cinnamon rolls but they are very tasty and so cute! I made these for a party my house was having, they were a huge hit.

I only made a few changes to this recipe. I whipped the eggs and sugar together for a fluffier dough and I used regular milk instead of half and half for the icing.

Sorry I haven’t been posting as much as I want to (and should)! Lots of awesome stuff happening right now (teaching a class tonight, started at a new bakery!!). I have a couple more recipes to put up and I promise they will be posted soon!

Cinnamon Roll Muffins

(Makes 12 muffins)

Dough
1/2 cup packed light brown sugar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 large egg, at room temperature
1 cup buttermilk, at room temperature
3 cups all-purpose flour (plus more as needed)

Filling
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
1 cup loosely packed light brown sugar
1 1/4 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Icing
1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 tablespoons milk
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 375°F and either grease each muffin well with butter or place a muffin cup in each well.

Whip the brown sugar, vanilla, and the egg in a large bowl until fluffy. Mix in the baking soda and salt, then add the buttermilk and whisk to incorporate. Switch to a rubber spatula, and add the flour to the bowl, mixing until a rough dough comes together. Give the flour a minute to absorb the liquid, then if necessary add additional flour until the dough is soft.

Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and knead the dough for a minute or two, until it is uniform. Roll the dough into a rectangle measuring approximately 12x24-inches. Brush the dough with the melted butter. In a small bowl, stir the brown sugar and cinnamon together. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over the surface of the dough. Starting with a wide side facing you, tightly roll the dough into a log. Cut the log into 12 pieces, 2 inches wide. Place one piece of dough into each well of the prepared muffin pan.

Bake the muffins for 15-18 minutes, or until golden brown. Transfer the pan to a wire rack and let the muffins cool for a few minutes then remove them to the rack.

While the muffins are baking, make the icing by whisking together the confectioner’s sugar, milk, and vanilla. After the muffins have cooled, drizzle them with the icing and serve warm.

Total Time: About 30 minutes

This lovely picture was taken by Rachel King. For more food photos please check out my facebook page!

March 21, 2013 @ 2:49 PM 14 notes

Tiramisu is one of my favorite desserts.
When I go to a restaurant and I’m going to have dessert I always look for tiramisu or creme brulee.
There are a couple reasons for this:
1. Both tiramisu and creme brulee are time consuming, so I don’t make them. I rarely think about the dessert I want to eat tomorrow night. I’m usually thinking about the dessert I want to eat right now. So if I’m going to have to let it sit in the fridge overnight, I’m only going to make it for a dinner I’ve planned out days in advance.
2. Although creme brulee and tiramisu are time consuming they are also unbelievably simple, so in order to have really good tiramisu or creme brulee the ingredients have to be really good.
3. They aren’t good for you. At all. I don’t really make them because I don’t like to know how much cream or butter goes into my dessert.
However, this recipe called to me, And the two tablespoons left in the bailey’s bottle on top of the fridge said it was meant to be.
This is a very easy, quick recipe. The cupcakes are airy, yet moist, which allows the coffee/liquor simple syrup to seep into it. The mascarpone frosting is light and airy and the dusting of chocolate makes it perfect.
This is a tiramisu you can whip up in an hour.
I got this recipe off of a spanish food blog. I used google translate to get the recipe, which ended up working out just fine, but due to google translator, I had to use the recipe as more of a guide than true instructions.
Tiramisu Cupcakes
(makes about 15 cupcakes)
Cupcakes
200 grams cake flour
200 grams sugar
200 grams butter, at room temp.
3 tsp vanilla extract
2 tsp baking powder
4 tsp milk
Heat oven to 355°F
In a large bowl, cream the sugar and butter together. Then add the eggs one at a time. Make sure each egg is absorbed into the sugar/butter before adding the next one. Beat everything together on high for 2 minutes and add the vanilla and milk and mix until combined. in a medium bowl, slowing mix the baking powder and flour together. Slowly mix the flour mixture to the wet ingredients until everything is  combined and there are no lumps.
Grease or line a muffin tin. Fill each muffin well to 2/3 full. Place the cupcakes in the oven for 16 minutes or until light golden in color and a tooth pick comes out clean when inserted.
While the cupcakes are baking, make the simple syrup!
Coffee Simple Syrup
150 ml brewed coffee
50 g sugar
2 tbs coffee liquor
Heat coffee and sugar until the sugar dissolves, take the syrup off the heat and add the coffee liquor.
Poke small holes in the cupcakes and slowly pour the simple syrup over the cupcakes so that the syrup soaks in.
Frosting
200 ml cream
250 ml mascarpone
80 g powdered sugar
cocoa powder or grated bitter sweet chocolate to decorate
Whip the cream, sugar and mascarpone together till thick. Put frosting into a pipping bag and frost the cupcakes in desired pattern. Dust the tops of the cupcakes with chocolate.
Serve immediately, you can keep leftover cupcakes in the fridge in an airtight container for a couple of days, but the simple syrup crystalizes inside the cupcakes and the frosting becomes dense. Still tasty, but not as good.
Total Time: About an hour
This lovely picture was taken by Rachel King. For more food photos please check out my facebook page! View Larger

Tiramisu is one of my favorite desserts.

When I go to a restaurant and I’m going to have dessert I always look for tiramisu or creme brulee.

There are a couple reasons for this:

1. Both tiramisu and creme brulee are time consuming, so I don’t make them. I rarely think about the dessert I want to eat tomorrow night. I’m usually thinking about the dessert I want to eat right now. So if I’m going to have to let it sit in the fridge overnight, I’m only going to make it for a dinner I’ve planned out days in advance.

2. Although creme brulee and tiramisu are time consuming they are also unbelievably simple, so in order to have really good tiramisu or creme brulee the ingredients have to be really good.

3. They aren’t good for you. At all. I don’t really make them because I don’t like to know how much cream or butter goes into my dessert.

However, this recipe called to me, And the two tablespoons left in the bailey’s bottle on top of the fridge said it was meant to be.

This is a very easy, quick recipe. The cupcakes are airy, yet moist, which allows the coffee/liquor simple syrup to seep into it. The mascarpone frosting is light and airy and the dusting of chocolate makes it perfect.

This is a tiramisu you can whip up in an hour.

I got this recipe off of a spanish food blog. I used google translate to get the recipe, which ended up working out just fine, but due to google translator, I had to use the recipe as more of a guide than true instructions.

Tiramisu Cupcakes

(makes about 15 cupcakes)

Cupcakes

200 grams cake flour

200 grams sugar

200 grams butter, at room temp.

3 tsp vanilla extract

2 tsp baking powder

4 tsp milk

Heat oven to 355°F

In a large bowl, cream the sugar and butter together. Then add the eggs one at a time. Make sure each egg is absorbed into the sugar/butter before adding the next one. Beat everything together on high for 2 minutes and add the vanilla and milk and mix until combined. in a medium bowl, slowing mix the baking powder and flour together. Slowly mix the flour mixture to the wet ingredients until everything is  combined and there are no lumps.

Grease or line a muffin tin. Fill each muffin well to 2/3 full. Place the cupcakes in the oven for 16 minutes or until light golden in color and a tooth pick comes out clean when inserted.

While the cupcakes are baking, make the simple syrup!

Coffee Simple Syrup

150 ml brewed coffee

50 g sugar

2 tbs coffee liquor

Heat coffee and sugar until the sugar dissolves, take the syrup off the heat and add the coffee liquor.

Poke small holes in the cupcakes and slowly pour the simple syrup over the cupcakes so that the syrup soaks in.

Frosting

200 ml cream

250 ml mascarpone

80 g powdered sugar

cocoa powder or grated bitter sweet chocolate to decorate

Whip the cream, sugar and mascarpone together till thick. Put frosting into a pipping bag and frost the cupcakes in desired pattern. Dust the tops of the cupcakes with chocolate.

Serve immediately, you can keep leftover cupcakes in the fridge in an airtight container for a couple of days, but the simple syrup crystalizes inside the cupcakes and the frosting becomes dense. Still tasty, but not as good.

Total Time: About an hour

This lovely picture was taken by Rachel King. For more food photos please check out my facebook page!

February 10, 2013 @ 7:13 PM 2 notes

This was my birthday cake this year.
Yes. I made my own birthday cake. I know you’re supposed to let other people take care of this kind of stuff, but it was such an interesting cake! I couldn’t let someone else make it before I got a chance!
I got this very interesting recipe from my mom. She emailed it to me saying:


This recipe sounded interesting because the person who sent in the recipe said the combo of the black pepper, chocolate and coffee gives great depth to the flavor. The person at the NY Times said she couldn’t stop eating it.


How could I pass up making this cake?
For my birthday, I met up with some friends at a cider bar near my house and I brought the cake to share. At the end of the night I had a couple slices of cake left over and I offered it to the bartenders. They took a small slice, and one of my friends said he saw them picking at the crumbs left on the napkin.
So I guess what I’m trying to say is that this is a good cake recipe.
It’s a rich and dense cake and (I think) tastes best after it comes to room temperature. However, you’ll be tempted to eat it warm. The whiskey in the cake comes through in waves, sometimes you’ll taste it in a bite, other times you won’t.
Whipped cream would make a lovely addition to the cake, and powdered sugar off sets the pitch black color of the cake nicely.
Chocolate Whiskey Cake
12 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces, more for pan
85 grams unsweetened cocoa powder
1 1/2 cups brewed strong coffee (I used stumptown coffee)
1/2 cup whiskey
200 grams granulated sugar
156 grams light brown sugar
240 grams all-purpose flour
8 grams baking soda
3 grams fine sea salt
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
3 large eggs
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup mini semisweet chocolate chips
Powdered sugar, for serving
Heat oven to 325°F.

Butter a 10-inch springform pan and dust with 2 tablespoons cocoa powder.

In a medium saucepan over low heat, warm coffee, whiskey, 12 tablespoons butter and the remaining 3/4 cup cocoa powder, whisking occasionally, until butter is melted. Whisk in the brown and white sugar until dissolved. Remove from heat and cool completely.

In a bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, salt, pepper and cloves.

In another bowl, whisk together eggs and vanilla. Slowly whisk egg mixture into chocolate mixture. Add dry ingredients and whisk to combine. Fold in chocolate chips.

Pour the batter into prepared pan. Tap the spring form pan lightly on the table to release any air bubbles. Transfer the cake to oven and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center emerges clean, about 50 minutes.

Let cool on a wire rack, then remove sides of pan. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.

To get the powdered sugar lines, place pieces of paper across the cake in the pattern you want and dust over the paper pattern. Carefully remove the paper from the cake, making sure to not pour any of the excess powder on the paper onto the cake or to smudge the powdered sugar on the cake.

Total Time: About an hour and half.

The lovely picture was taken by my very talented roommate, Rachel King. View Larger

This was my birthday cake this year.

Yes. I made my own birthday cake. I know you’re supposed to let other people take care of this kind of stuff, but it was such an interesting cake! I couldn’t let someone else make it before I got a chance!

I got this very interesting recipe from my mom. She emailed it to me saying:

This recipe sounded interesting because the person who sent in the recipe said the combo of the black pepper, chocolate and coffee gives great depth to the flavor. The person at the NY Times said she couldn’t stop eating it.

How could I pass up making this cake?

For my birthday, I met up with some friends at a cider bar near my house and I brought the cake to share. At the end of the night I had a couple slices of cake left over and I offered it to the bartenders. They took a small slice, and one of my friends said he saw them picking at the crumbs left on the napkin.

So I guess what I’m trying to say is that this is a good cake recipe.

It’s a rich and dense cake and (I think) tastes best after it comes to room temperature. However, you’ll be tempted to eat it warm. The whiskey in the cake comes through in waves, sometimes you’ll taste it in a bite, other times you won’t.

Whipped cream would make a lovely addition to the cake, and powdered sugar off sets the pitch black color of the cake nicely.

Chocolate Whiskey Cake

12 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces, more for pan

85 grams unsweetened cocoa powder

1 1/2 cups brewed strong coffee (I used stumptown coffee)

1/2 cup whiskey

200 grams granulated sugar

156 grams light brown sugar

240 grams all-purpose flour

8 grams baking soda

3 grams fine sea salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

3 large eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1 cup mini semisweet chocolate chips

Powdered sugar, for serving

Heat oven to 325°F.
Butter a 10-inch springform pan and dust with 2 tablespoons cocoa powder.
In a medium saucepan over low heat, warm coffee, whiskey, 12 tablespoons butter and the remaining 3/4 cup cocoa powder, whisking occasionally, until butter is melted. Whisk in the brown and white sugar until dissolved. Remove from heat and cool completely.
In a bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, salt, pepper and cloves.
In another bowl, whisk together eggs and vanilla. Slowly whisk egg mixture into chocolate mixture. Add dry ingredients and whisk to combine. Fold in chocolate chips.
Pour the batter into prepared pan. Tap the spring form pan lightly on the table to release any air bubbles. Transfer the cake to oven and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center emerges clean, about 50 minutes.
Let cool on a wire rack, then remove sides of pan. Dust with powdered sugar before serving.
To get the powdered sugar lines, place pieces of paper across the cake in the pattern you want and dust over the paper pattern. Carefully remove the paper from the cake, making sure to not pour any of the excess powder on the paper onto the cake or to smudge the powdered sugar on the cake.
Total Time: About an hour and half.
The lovely picture was taken by my very talented roommate, Rachel King.
December 23, 2012 @ 3:48 AM 12 notes

I never thought you could make oatmeal cookies that melt in your mouth.
I have been proven wrong.
I made these cookies because I wanted something little and sweet to eat, but my house is out of all purpose flour (we’ve got plenty of other flours, of course). So I was looking for a dessert recipe that only called for whole wheat flour. Using only whole wheat flour in desserts can be a little… healthy tasting.
My favorite “healthy” food blog is 101 Cookbooks. Her recipes are reliable and tasty and easy to tweak. There isn’t a lot of flour in this recipe so it doesn’t weigh the cookies down and the flour adds a nice depth of flavor to the cookies.
I also think it would be easy to substitute the flour for something else, if you’re looking for a nice gluten free cookie recipe. For this recipe, I added vanilla extract and left out the fennel seeds. In the original recipe, it says that the cookies do not last much longer than right after they come out of the oven, however I did not find this to be the case you just put them in an airtight container.
Lacy Oatmeal Cookies
1 tablespoon whole wheat flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 teaspoons poppy seeds
1/2 cup unsalted butter
1 1/2 cup / 5 oz uncooked rolled oats (not instant)
1 egg, room temperature
1/3 cup sugar
1/3 cup brown sugar
Preheat oven to 350°F with a rack in the top third. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.
In a small bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and poppy seeds. Set aside.
Melt the butter in a medium saucepan. When just melted, remove from heat and stir in the oats and vanilla. Stir until well coated.
In a large bowl, whisk the sugar with the egg until it is the consistency of a creamy icing Whisk the flour mixture in, and then add the oats. Stir until combined, then drop, a level tablespoon at a time, onto the prepared baking sheets, at least 2 inches apart.
Bake until very deeply golden, about 8-10 minutes. Remove, and let sit for a few minutes, then transfer to a rack to continue cooling. Eat immediately or keep in an airtight container for a week.
Total Time: About 20 minutes
Picture taken by the lovely and amazing Rachel King

I never thought you could make oatmeal cookies that melt in your mouth.

I have been proven wrong.

I made these cookies because I wanted something little and sweet to eat, but my house is out of all purpose flour (we’ve got plenty of other flours, of course). So I was looking for a dessert recipe that only called for whole wheat flour. Using only whole wheat flour in desserts can be a little… healthy tasting.

My favorite “healthy” food blog is 101 Cookbooks. Her recipes are reliable and tasty and easy to tweak. There isn’t a lot of flour in this recipe so it doesn’t weigh the cookies down and the flour adds a nice depth of flavor to the cookies.

I also think it would be easy to substitute the flour for something else, if you’re looking for a nice gluten free cookie recipe. For this recipe, I added vanilla extract and left out the fennel seeds. In the original recipe, it says that the cookies do not last much longer than right after they come out of the oven, however I did not find this to be the case you just put them in an airtight container.

Lacy Oatmeal Cookies

1 tablespoon whole wheat flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon fine grain sea salt

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

4 teaspoons poppy seeds

1/2 cup unsalted butter

1 1/2 cup / 5 oz uncooked rolled oats (not instant)

1 egg, room temperature

1/3 cup sugar

1/3 cup brown sugar

Preheat oven to 350°F with a rack in the top third. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

In a small bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, salt, and poppy seeds. Set aside.

Melt the butter in a medium saucepan. When just melted, remove from heat and stir in the oats and vanilla. Stir until well coated.

In a large bowl, whisk the sugar with the egg until it is the consistency of a creamy icing Whisk the flour mixture in, and then add the oats. Stir until combined, then drop, a level tablespoon at a time, onto the prepared baking sheets, at least 2 inches apart.

Bake until very deeply golden, about 8-10 minutes. Remove, and let sit for a few minutes, then transfer to a rack to continue cooling. Eat immediately or keep in an airtight container for a week.

Total Time: About 20 minutes

Picture taken by the lovely and amazing Rachel King

December 20, 2012 @ 10:56 PM 4 notes

Sometimes all you want is just a tiny bite of something sweet.
I made these little guys for Thanksgiving.
I had a lovely friend-Thanksgiving this year. My first one! It made me feel all weirdly independent and adult-y! Which makes me think I have some growing up to do…We did our dinner potluck style, everyone was in charge of making one or two items for the dinner and we all chipped in for the turkey.
I decided to make the Thanksgiving pies: An apple pie  and a pumpkin pie. However, two large pies (with everything else we were having) seemed like a bit much for just 7 people. I tried to find a recipe for mini pumpkin pies online, but wasn’t really satisfied with what I found, so I ended up coming up with a recipe myself. They keep really well in the fridge, which is also nice.
I decided to use a cream cheese crust recipe (it’s actually a tweaked cream cheese dough recipe for the rugelach) because cream cheese dough is denser than regular pie dough and therefore more resilient when you’re constantly shaping it. The pumpkin pie filling is based on the pumpkin pie filling found on Smitten Kitchen, with some changes.
Two Bite Pumpkin Pies
(makes 48 mini pies)
Dough
2 cups flour
8 ounces cream cheese
2 sticks (1 cup) cold unsalted butter
1/2 cup confectioners sugar
Pinch of salt
1 tsp vanilla extract
Cut the butter and cream cheese into small even pieces. Mix all the ingredients for the dough together in a standard mixer until a soft dough has formed. Flatten the dough into a disk and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.
Filling
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/2 cup whole milk
1 large egg and 1 large egg yolk
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
15 ounces pumpkin puree
1/3 cup sugar
1/4 cup maple syrup
1 tsp pumpkin pie spice
Whisk cream, milk, eggs, yolks and vanilla and pumpkin pie spice together in medium bowl and then stir in the pumpkin puree till the mixture is smooth.
Grease a mini cupcake tin. Cut the dough into 48 small cubes. Roll the cubes into balls and place each ball in a muffin well. Using a lightly floured tart tamper (or the end of a rolling pin) push each ball into the wells of the muffin tin. The dough should form to the muffin tin well. Move the tart tamper in a circular motion to keep the sides of the tarts even. Re-dust the tamper/rolling pin between each well.
Preheat the oven to 400 °F and place the muffin tin in the fridge for 30 minutes to chill. After the dough has chilled, place one tablespoon of filling into each well. Bake in the oven for about 15 minutes, or until the crusts of the pies are a nice light brown. Let the mini pies rest in the muffin pan for at least 10 minutes before popping them out, either by lightly tapping the pan upside down on the counter or pushing lightly on one side each pie with your finger.
Enjoy!
Total Time: About 2 hours View Larger

Sometimes all you want is just a tiny bite of something sweet.

I made these little guys for Thanksgiving.

I had a lovely friend-Thanksgiving this year. My first one! It made me feel all weirdly independent and adult-y! Which makes me think I have some growing up to do…We did our dinner potluck style, everyone was in charge of making one or two items for the dinner and we all chipped in for the turkey.

I decided to make the Thanksgiving pies: An apple pie  and a pumpkin pie. However, two large pies (with everything else we were having) seemed like a bit much for just 7 people. I tried to find a recipe for mini pumpkin pies online, but wasn’t really satisfied with what I found, so I ended up coming up with a recipe myself. They keep really well in the fridge, which is also nice.

I decided to use a cream cheese crust recipe (it’s actually a tweaked cream cheese dough recipe for the rugelach) because cream cheese dough is denser than regular pie dough and therefore more resilient when you’re constantly shaping it. The pumpkin pie filling is based on the pumpkin pie filling found on Smitten Kitchen, with some changes.

Two Bite Pumpkin Pies

(makes 48 mini pies)

Dough

2 cups flour

8 ounces cream cheese

2 sticks (1 cup) cold unsalted butter

1/2 cup confectioners sugar

Pinch of salt

1 tsp vanilla extract

Cut the butter and cream cheese into small even pieces. Mix all the ingredients for the dough together in a standard mixer until a soft dough has formed. Flatten the dough into a disk and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.

Filling

1/2 cup heavy cream

1/2 cup whole milk

1 large egg and 1 large egg yolk

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

15 ounces pumpkin puree

1/3 cup sugar

1/4 cup maple syrup

1 tsp pumpkin pie spice

Whisk cream, milk, eggs, yolks and vanilla and pumpkin pie spice together in medium bowl and then stir in the pumpkin puree till the mixture is smooth.

Grease a mini cupcake tin. Cut the dough into 48 small cubes. Roll the cubes into balls and place each ball in a muffin well. Using a lightly floured tart tamper (or the end of a rolling pin) push each ball into the wells of the muffin tin. The dough should form to the muffin tin well. Move the tart tamper in a circular motion to keep the sides of the tarts even. Re-dust the tamper/rolling pin between each well.

Preheat the oven to 400 °F and place the muffin tin in the fridge for 30 minutes to chill. After the dough has chilled, place one tablespoon of filling into each well. Bake in the oven for about 15 minutes, or until the crusts of the pies are a nice light brown. Let the mini pies rest in the muffin pan for at least 10 minutes before popping them out, either by lightly tapping the pan upside down on the counter or pushing lightly on one side each pie with your finger.

Enjoy!

Total Time: About 2 hours

November 26, 2012 @ 3:12 PM 1 note

I can’t resist antique baking pans.
Usually baking pans are fairly inexpensive at antique shops. They’re usually made out of very thin tin, so, I guess, they aren’t really worth much. They are also a pain to clean, but how they look tends to make up for it.
I found these little jello tins at an antique shop. Now, I don’t like jello (the texture and the fake colors and the way it just slides down your throat…blech), but I love personal sized food. I knew they’d be the perfect size for some mini cakes.
Aren’t they so cute?
These little guys came out nice and spongy and just a bit moist. Usually at least one of my little cakes doesn’t pop out of the mold correctly, but they all popped out after the tins were tapped a couple times. They came out so perfect!
I left out the ginger in this recipe (although I’m sure it would add a nice little bite to them), and I add the powdered sugar for a bit of decoration.
Pumpkin and spice Cakelets
(Makes 5 very mini cakes plus 6 small sized bundt cakes)
1 cup pumpkin puree (Recipe) 2 eggs 1/2 cup vegetable oil 1/3 cup water 1 1/2 cups white sugar 1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour 1 tsp baking soda 1/2 tsp salt 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground nutmeg 1/4 tsp ground cloves
Preheat oven to 350 °F. Cover the tins with oil and then lightly dust them with flour.
In a large bowl, Whisk together pumpkin puree, eggs, oil, water and sugar. Then in a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Mix the dry ingredients with the pumpkin mixture until just blended.  Pour into the molds about 2/3 full.
Bake for about 15 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
Total time: About 30 minutes
Pictures taken by the amazing Rachel King! View Larger

I can’t resist antique baking pans.

Usually baking pans are fairly inexpensive at antique shops. They’re usually made out of very thin tin, so, I guess, they aren’t really worth much. They are also a pain to clean, but how they look tends to make up for it.

I found these little jello tins at an antique shop. Now, I don’t like jello (the texture and the fake colors and the way it just slides down your throat…blech), but I love personal sized food. I knew they’d be the perfect size for some mini cakes.

Aren’t they so cute?

These little guys came out nice and spongy and just a bit moist. Usually at least one of my little cakes doesn’t pop out of the mold correctly, but they all popped out after the tins were tapped a couple times. They came out so perfect!

I left out the ginger in this recipe (although I’m sure it would add a nice little bite to them), and I add the powdered sugar for a bit of decoration.

Pumpkin and spice Cakelets

(Makes 5 very mini cakes plus 6 small sized bundt cakes)

1 cup pumpkin puree (Recipe)
2 eggs
1/2 cup vegetable oil
1/3 cup water
1 1/2 cups white sugar
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
1/4 tsp ground cloves

Preheat oven to 350 °F. Cover the tins with oil and then lightly dust them with flour.

In a large bowl, Whisk together pumpkin puree, eggs, oil, water and sugar. Then in a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves. Mix the dry ingredients with the pumpkin mixture until just blended.  Pour into the molds about 2/3 full.

Bake for about 15 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.

Total time: About 30 minutes

Pictures taken by the amazing Rachel King!

November 13, 2012 @ 12:13 AM 3 notes

Apples are really an underrated fruit.
I mean, people take apples for granted.
But damn.
A good apple?
You just can’t beat it.
And there’s so much you can do with apple that’s just so great.
I have the good fortune of living with someone who has an apple connection. Their parents have a bunch of apple trees in their backyard so we got a couple boxes of apples for free!
I decided to make an apple galette with a non-traditional spin. I didn’t use any recipes online (although, I’m sure this was inspired by many recipes I’ve flipped through). I was going to make some mini pies, but galette’s are just so fun (and so much easier)!
A galette is a rustic free-form pie. They are very simple and really wonderful if you don’t have a pie tin. They also look really sweet and they sound all fancy so everyone thinks you’ve put more work into them.
You will probably have some filling left over, eat it while you wait for the pies to bake!
Cracked Pepper and Cheddar Apple Galette (Makes 1 large galette or 6 small)
Crust
1 1/4 cup white pastry flour
1 tbs sugar
1 stick of cold butter (8 tbs)
About 1/4 cup ice water
Mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and cut up your butter in small pieces and place them in the bowl with your dry ingredients. If there is space in your freezer, stick the bowl in the freezer for at least 10 minutes. The colder your ingredients are the better your crust will be.
Take the bowl out of the freezer and incorporate the butter into the dry ingredients until most of the pieces of butter are the size of a pebble. Leave some larger chunks of butter as well, but not too many. Slowly add the ice water to the mixture until a nice soft ball of dough forms. If you’ve made the dough too wet, add more flour. Still too dry? Add more water.
Flatten the dough into a disk, wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and place it in the fridge for at least one hour. Overnight is better.
Filling
4 large apples or 5-6 small ones, cored and then sliced thin with a mandolin
1 tsp cinnamon
1 1/2 cups grated sharp cheddar
1 1/2 tsp fresh cracked pepper
1 tsp salt
1/4 cup sugar
Milk or a whisked egg for finishing
Toss all the ingredients together in a bowl till the apples are all evenly coated and the cheese is evenly distributed throughout the bowl.
Preheat the oven to 425°F.
To assemble the galette(s), roll out the dough* on a lightly floured surface to about 1/8 inch thickness. Rotate and flip the dough as you go to make sure it stays round. Your dough still isn’t round? It’s rustic! Who cares?!
Place the round of dough on a pan covered in parchment paper. To fill the galette, carefully arrange the apple slices in a circle starting from the center moving towards the edges of the dough. Keep the apples at least 4 inches (1-2 1/2 inches for a small galette) from the edge of the dough, once the circle of apples has been created, pile more apples in the circle formation upwards till the center is about 2 inches tall. Fold the excess dough up and over the apple slices, pinching the dough together so the only opening is in the very center of the galette.
Place the galette(s) in the freezer for 10 minutes.
Brush the galette all over with the egg or milk.
Place in the oven for 30 minutes (for the large galette, 20 minutes for the small) or until golden brown.
Take out of the oven and let cool on a rack for at least 15 minutes before serving.
*if you are making small galettes use 2 1/2 ounces of dough for each galette
Total Time: About 2 hours View Larger

Apples are really an underrated fruit.

I mean, people take apples for granted.

But damn.

A good apple?

You just can’t beat it.

And there’s so much you can do with apple that’s just so great.

I have the good fortune of living with someone who has an apple connection. Their parents have a bunch of apple trees in their backyard so we got a couple boxes of apples for free!

I decided to make an apple galette with a non-traditional spin. I didn’t use any recipes online (although, I’m sure this was inspired by many recipes I’ve flipped through). I was going to make some mini pies, but galette’s are just so fun (and so much easier)!

A galette is a rustic free-form pie. They are very simple and really wonderful if you don’t have a pie tin. They also look really sweet and they sound all fancy so everyone thinks you’ve put more work into them.

You will probably have some filling left over, eat it while you wait for the pies to bake!

Cracked Pepper and Cheddar Apple Galette
(Makes 1 large galette or 6 small)

Crust

1 1/4 cup white pastry flour

1 tbs sugar

1 stick of cold butter (8 tbs)

About 1/4 cup ice water

Mix all the dry ingredients together in a bowl and cut up your butter in small pieces and place them in the bowl with your dry ingredients. If there is space in your freezer, stick the bowl in the freezer for at least 10 minutes. The colder your ingredients are the better your crust will be.

Take the bowl out of the freezer and incorporate the butter into the dry ingredients until most of the pieces of butter are the size of a pebble. Leave some larger chunks of butter as well, but not too many. Slowly add the ice water to the mixture until a nice soft ball of dough forms. If you’ve made the dough too wet, add more flour. Still too dry? Add more water.

Flatten the dough into a disk, wrap it tightly with plastic wrap and place it in the fridge for at least one hour. Overnight is better.

Filling

4 large apples or 5-6 small ones, cored and then sliced thin with a mandolin

1 tsp cinnamon

1 1/2 cups grated sharp cheddar

1 1/2 tsp fresh cracked pepper

1 tsp salt

1/4 cup sugar

Milk or a whisked egg for finishing

Toss all the ingredients together in a bowl till the apples are all evenly coated and the cheese is evenly distributed throughout the bowl.

Preheat the oven to 425°F.

To assemble the galette(s), roll out the dough* on a lightly floured surface to about 1/8 inch thickness. Rotate and flip the dough as you go to make sure it stays round. Your dough still isn’t round? It’s rustic! Who cares?!

Place the round of dough on a pan covered in parchment paper. To fill the galette, carefully arrange the apple slices in a circle starting from the center moving towards the edges of the dough. Keep the apples at least 4 inches (1-2 1/2 inches for a small galette) from the edge of the dough, once the circle of apples has been created, pile more apples in the circle formation upwards till the center is about 2 inches tall. Fold the excess dough up and over the apple slices, pinching the dough together so the only opening is in the very center of the galette.

Place the galette(s) in the freezer for 10 minutes.

Brush the galette all over with the egg or milk.

Place in the oven for 30 minutes (for the large galette, 20 minutes for the small) or until golden brown.

Take out of the oven and let cool on a rack for at least 15 minutes before serving.

*if you are making small galettes use 2 1/2 ounces of dough for each galette

Total Time: About 2 hours

October 16, 2012 @ 2:35 AM 9 notes

Oh, Creme Brulee.
It’s one of my favorite desserts. When I was in high school my parents gave me a creme brulee set for hannukah and I was so excited and then when I decided I was going to make creme brulee, I couldn’t find the set.
Then I moved to Portland and I found a set at a garage sale for $5. When I bought it the woman looked like she’d realized she could have sold it for more. Haha!
Then that sat on my shelf for another 9 months because I kept forgetting to get butane for the torch.
I finally got butane and let me tell you, there are going to be a lot more torched recipes on this blog…
I skipped a lot of the wait time on this recipe. It wanted me to let the custard sit over night (HELL NO, I WANT MY CREME BRULEE NOW). And then let it sit for another 4 hours… and I just decided to not do it. It turned out fine. So there. I don’t understand warming up the cream and vanilla bean and then letting it cool except that it might infuse the vanilla into the cream more. I did it, but I think you could probably skip that too.
I used all the tiny pans I had (creme brulee pans, brioche tins, muffin tins…) and I found that muffin tins worked and looked the best, so if you’re worried that you don’t have enough tins, you do. As for the torch… go get one. They are so much fun!
Cinnamon & Vanilla Bean Creme Brulee Tartlets
Custard
720 ml heavy whipping cream
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise to expose seeds
10 egg yolks
80 grams granulated sugar, plus extra for torching In a large saucepan over medium-low heat, combine the cream, cinnamon stick, and vanilla bean and bring just to a simmer. Remove from heat, pour into a glass or metal bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for about 4 hours or overnight.
Now is a good time to scroll down and start the tart crust!
 Reheat the cream mixture just to a boil, then remove from heat and set aside. In a large metal or glass bowl, whisk the egg whites and sugar for about a minute until the sugar is mostly dissolved. Pour about 1/4 of the hot cream mixture through a sieve into the egg yolk mixture and whisk well to combine. Pour the rest of the cream through the sieve into the egg yolk mixture, and discard the leftover cinnamon stick and vanilla bean pod. Whisk well to combine. Set bowl containing egg/cream mixture over a pot of barely simmering water to create a double boiler, making sure that the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water itself. Cook, whisking constantly over the simmering water for 10-15 minutes or until it begins to thicken. Once the custard has thickened (it will not be as thick as a pastry cream), remove from heat and whisk for another two minutes to start the cooling process. Once it has cooled a bit, set a layer of plastic wrap directly on the custard, this will prevent it from getting a skin, and chill for at least an hour or until it has thickened considerably.
Pate Brisee Tart Shells 400 grams (14 oz) unsalted butter, chilled, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar
100 grams (3 1/2 oz) granulated sugar

2/3 cup water, chilled

665 grams (1 lb 7 1/2 oz) all purpose flour

1 teaspoon salt In a small bowl, combine sugar, water, and vinegar, stir to aid the dissolving of the sugar. Set aside in refrigerator for 10 minutes. Then, stir again to completely dissolve sugar. In the bowl of a standard mixer using the paddle, combine the flour and salt together. Add the butter, and stir on a medium until butter is cut in and evenly dispersed. You should have visible chunks of butter in your flour mixture, this is where the flakiness comes from.



Slowly add the water mixture with the flour until it is evenly dispersed. dump dough out onto a clean surface and knead gently a few times, just until dough comes together in one cohesive ball.

Cut the dough into two disks and roll out the dough. Wrap the dough you are not using tightly in plastic wrap and place in the fridge. Using a 4-inch round cookie cutter (or any circular cookie cutter that is about 1/2 wider than the bottom of your mold), cut circles out of each disc of dough. Press each disc into your tart mold (a muffin tin actually works perfect if you don’t have tart pans), being careful not to stretch the dough, as this will cause shrinkage when baking. Push the excess off the edge by rolling your rolling pin across the edges of your tart molds and slowly pulling off the excess dough around the edges. and make sure the dough gets into each nook and cranny of the tart mold. 

Freeze shells for at least 20 minutes before baking. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line each tart shell with a small piece of tin foil and fill with beans, rice, or pie weights. Place tart shells on a baking sheet and bake for 20, or until shells gain a bit of color. Take out the weights and bake for another 5 minutes, until the shells are a light brown.

Let shells cool in molds for at least 15 minutes, then gently un-mold and cool completely on a cooling rack. You can make these ahead of time, then freeze until ready to fill.
Assembly Fill the tart shells with the custard. You can overfill them a bit and then use a off set spatula to scrape any excess off the top, leaving a nice flat surface for the torched sugar. Once all the tarts are filled, chill them for at least 15 minutes before torching. Sprinkle about a teaspoon or so of sugar in a thin layer over each tart, and use a kitchen torch to caramelize sugar. Concentrate mostly on the center, and torch gently around the edges being careful not to burn the edges of the pastry.
Let the tarts sit for a minute so the sugar has hardened before you serve them.
Enjoy!
Total Time: About 6 hours
Picture taken by the amazing Rachel King View Larger

Oh, Creme Brulee.

It’s one of my favorite desserts. When I was in high school my parents gave me a creme brulee set for hannukah and I was so excited and then when I decided I was going to make creme brulee, I couldn’t find the set.

Then I moved to Portland and I found a set at a garage sale for $5. When I bought it the woman looked like she’d realized she could have sold it for more. Haha!

Then that sat on my shelf for another 9 months because I kept forgetting to get butane for the torch.

I finally got butane and let me tell you, there are going to be a lot more torched recipes on this blog…

I skipped a lot of the wait time on this recipe. It wanted me to let the custard sit over night (HELL NO, I WANT MY CREME BRULEE NOW). And then let it sit for another 4 hours… and I just decided to not do it. It turned out fine. So there. I don’t understand warming up the cream and vanilla bean and then letting it cool except that it might infuse the vanilla into the cream more. I did it, but I think you could probably skip that too.

I used all the tiny pans I had (creme brulee pans, brioche tins, muffin tins…) and I found that muffin tins worked and looked the best, so if you’re worried that you don’t have enough tins, you do. As for the torch… go get one. They are so much fun!

Cinnamon & Vanilla Bean Creme Brulee Tartlets

Custard

720 ml heavy whipping cream

1/4 tsp cinnamon

1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise to expose seeds

10 egg yolks

80 grams granulated sugar, plus extra for torching

In a large saucepan over medium-low heat, combine the cream, cinnamon stick, and vanilla bean and bring just to a simmer. Remove from heat, pour into a glass or metal bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate for about 4 hours or overnight.

Now is a good time to scroll down and start the tart crust!


Reheat the cream mixture just to a boil, then remove from heat and set aside.

In a large metal or glass bowl, whisk the egg whites and sugar for about a minute until the sugar is mostly dissolved.

Pour about 1/4 of the hot cream mixture through a sieve into the egg yolk mixture and whisk well to combine. Pour the rest of the cream through the sieve into the egg yolk mixture, and discard the leftover cinnamon stick and vanilla bean pod. Whisk well to combine.

Set bowl containing egg/cream mixture over a pot of barely simmering water to create a double boiler, making sure that the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water itself. Cook, whisking constantly over the simmering water for 10-15 minutes or until it begins to thicken.

Once the custard has thickened (it will not be as thick as a pastry cream), remove from heat and whisk for another two minutes to start the cooling process. Once it has cooled a bit, set a layer of plastic wrap directly on the custard, this will prevent it from getting a skin, and chill for at least an hour or until it has thickened considerably.

Pate Brisee Tart Shells

400 grams (14 oz) unsalted butter, chilled, cut into 1/2 inch cubes

1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar

100 grams (3 1/2 oz) granulated sugar
2/3 cup water, chilled
665 grams (1 lb 7 1/2 oz) all purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt

In a small bowl, combine sugar, water, and vinegar, stir to aid the dissolving of the sugar. Set aside in refrigerator for 10 minutes. Then, stir again to completely dissolve sugar.

In the bowl of a standard mixer using the paddle, combine the flour and salt together. Add the butter, and stir on a medium until butter is cut in and evenly dispersed. You should have visible chunks of butter in your flour mixture, this is where the flakiness comes from.
Slowly add the water mixture with the flour until it is evenly dispersed. dump dough out onto a clean surface and knead gently a few times, just until dough comes together in one cohesive ball.
Cut the dough into two disks and roll out the dough. Wrap the dough you are not using tightly in plastic wrap and place in the fridge. Using a 4-inch round cookie cutter (or any circular cookie cutter that is about 1/2 wider than the bottom of your mold), cut circles out of each disc of dough. Press each disc into your tart mold (a muffin tin actually works perfect if you don’t have tart pans), being careful not to stretch the dough, as this will cause shrinkage when baking. Push the excess off the edge by rolling your rolling pin across the edges of your tart molds and slowly pulling off the excess dough around the edges. and make sure the dough gets into each nook and cranny of the tart mold. 
Freeze shells for at least 20 minutes before baking. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Line each tart shell with a small piece of tin foil and fill with beans, rice, or pie weights. Place tart shells on a baking sheet and bake for 20, or until shells gain a bit of color. Take out the weights and bake for another 5 minutes, until the shells are a light brown.
Let shells cool in molds for at least 15 minutes, then gently un-mold and cool completely on a cooling rack. You can make these ahead of time, then freeze until ready to fill.

Assembly
Fill the tart shells with the custard. You can overfill them a bit and then use a off set spatula to scrape any excess off the top, leaving a nice flat surface for the torched sugar. Once all the tarts are filled, chill them for at least 15 minutes before torching.

Sprinkle about a teaspoon or so of sugar in a thin layer over each tart, and use a kitchen torch to caramelize sugar. Concentrate mostly on the center, and torch gently around the edges being careful not to burn the edges of the pastry.

Let the tarts sit for a minute so the sugar has hardened before you serve them.

Enjoy!

Total Time: About 6 hours

Picture taken by the amazing Rachel King

September 19, 2012 @ 5:04 PM 5 notes

Creme Brulee Tartlets?!
Stay tuned for the recipe!

Beautiful pictures taken by the wonderful Rachel King

Creme Brulee Tartlets?!

Stay tuned for the recipe!

Beautiful pictures taken by the wonderful Rachel King

September 18, 2012 @ 1:52 AM 5 notes

I’ve had rugelach on occasion. Not very often though.
Usually I’ll have one when I’m in Chicago visiting my dad’s side of the family. It reminds me of real deli’s. Deli’s we don’t have in the NW. It is flaky and rich and light while still full of flavor. I remember when I was little, we would buy them at the counter of this one deli/restaurant, Max’s, that we would always go to when we’d visit Chicago. They have the most amazing matzo ball soup.
We’d touch down in the O’Hare airport and my sisters and I would beg to go to Max’s for the Matzo ball soup.
The last time I was in Chicago I stayed with one of my cousins and she told me that we were not going to Max’s because my family always wants to go there and that there were other places besides Max’s to eat in Chicago. I laughed because in my head Max’s is the only place to eat in Chicago.
But anyway, rugelach.
One of my friends wanted to make rugelach. I’d never made it before, but I’m always up for trying a new recipe. Rugelach are really easy to make and don’t take too long. We had a lot of fun rolling out the dough and then rolling up all the little rugelach.
A couple weeks ago my boss had given me a a jar of vanilla peach jam she had made so we used it as the filling and I added lemon zest to the dough.
This recipe is from a wonderful Jewish cookbook my mom gave me: Jewish Cooking in America by Joan Nathan.
Vanilla Peach Rugelach
Dough
2 cups flour
8 ounces cream cheese
2 sticks (1 cup) cold unsalted butter
1/2 confectioners sugar
Pinch of salt
1/2 tsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp lemon zest
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Filling
1 cup peach jam
3/4 walnuts, chopped into small pieces
Garnish
1 egg
1/4 cup raw (or granulated) sugar
Cut the butter and cream cheese into small even pieces. Mix all the ingredients for the dough together in a standard mixer until a soft dough has formed. Flatten the dough into a disk and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
Cut the dough into 4 pieces and roll each piece into a round disk that is about 1/8 inch thick. Spread the peach jam evenly in a thin layer over the whole disk and sprinkle the walnut pieces over the jam. Cut the disk, like a pizza, into triangles with the wide side of the dough being about an inch thick. Roll each piece inwards toward the center of the disk and place the cookies on a baking sheet covered in parchment, leaving about 1/4 inch between each cookie.
Beat the egg and brush each cookie with egg. Sprinkle sugar evenly over the cookies and place the tray in the over for 25 minutes, or until golden brown.
Enjoy!
Total Time: About 2 hours View Larger

I’ve had rugelach on occasion. Not very often though.

Usually I’ll have one when I’m in Chicago visiting my dad’s side of the family. It reminds me of real deli’s. Deli’s we don’t have in the NW. It is flaky and rich and light while still full of flavor. I remember when I was little, we would buy them at the counter of this one deli/restaurant, Max’s, that we would always go to when we’d visit Chicago. They have the most amazing matzo ball soup.

We’d touch down in the O’Hare airport and my sisters and I would beg to go to Max’s for the Matzo ball soup.

The last time I was in Chicago I stayed with one of my cousins and she told me that we were not going to Max’s because my family always wants to go there and that there were other places besides Max’s to eat in Chicago. I laughed because in my head Max’s is the only place to eat in Chicago.

But anyway, rugelach.

One of my friends wanted to make rugelach. I’d never made it before, but I’m always up for trying a new recipe. Rugelach are really easy to make and don’t take too long. We had a lot of fun rolling out the dough and then rolling up all the little rugelach.

A couple weeks ago my boss had given me a a jar of vanilla peach jam she had made so we used it as the filling and I added lemon zest to the dough.

This recipe is from a wonderful Jewish cookbook my mom gave me: Jewish Cooking in America by Joan Nathan.

Vanilla Peach Rugelach

Dough

2 cups flour

8 ounces cream cheese

2 sticks (1 cup) cold unsalted butter

1/2 confectioners sugar

Pinch of salt

1/2 tsp lemon juice

1/2 tsp lemon zest

1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Filling

1 cup peach jam

3/4 walnuts, chopped into small pieces

Garnish

1 egg

1/4 cup raw (or granulated) sugar

Cut the butter and cream cheese into small even pieces. Mix all the ingredients for the dough together in a standard mixer until a soft dough has formed. Flatten the dough into a disk and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Cut the dough into 4 pieces and roll each piece into a round disk that is about 1/8 inch thick. Spread the peach jam evenly in a thin layer over the whole disk and sprinkle the walnut pieces over the jam. Cut the disk, like a pizza, into triangles with the wide side of the dough being about an inch thick. Roll each piece inwards toward the center of the disk and place the cookies on a baking sheet covered in parchment, leaving about 1/4 inch between each cookie.

Beat the egg and brush each cookie with egg. Sprinkle sugar evenly over the cookies and place the tray in the over for 25 minutes, or until golden brown.

Enjoy!

Total Time: About 2 hours

September 13, 2012 @ 8:59 PM 2 notes

Shortbread cookies are so wonderful because they are so simple.
I like shortbread cookies as they are, but every once in a while I like to dress them up. They do dress up so nicely.
I rarely make shortbread cookies because the process of rolling and stamping can be so boring. Especially the stamping. So deciding to make these cookies is a bit odd. Especially since these cookies are so small, so you’re stamping out cookies for a while. I’m not sure if you can tell from the picture, but the cookies are the size of your thumb.
I changed a couple things in this recipe. I added vanilla bean seeds to the cookies, I used a smaller cookie cutter and I baked the cookies for only 10 minutes (due to how small they were).
If you don’t have time to wait for the dough to cool in the fridge, place it in the freezer for 30 minutes instead. You can also do the same to harden up the chocolate on the cookies after you dip them.
I used some cherry blueberry jam that I got at a food exchange in between the cookies. I think that raspberry jam would be nice too.
Chocolate Dipped Jam Sandwich Cookies
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp salt
2 cups (280 g) all purpose flour
12 Tbsp butter, softened
1/4 cup (50 g) sugar
1/4 cup (28 gr) powdered sugar
1 egg
Seeds scrapped from 4 vanilla beans
jam or marmalade Whisk together the baking powder, salt, vanilla bean seeds and flour in a bowl. Set aside.  In a mixer bowl, cream 12 Tbsp of butter for 2 – 3 minutes until light and fluffy and then slowly add the sugar and powdered sugar and continue to beat for a few more minutes. Add the egg one and beat in well. Slowly add in the flour mixture in three stages, mixing just until combined. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and form into disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.
Preheat oven to 350˚ F.
Prepare baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Roll out the cold dough on a lightly floured surface to a 1/2 inch thickness. Using a 1 inch cookie cutter (or whatever size you like), cut out small rounds. Re-roll the leftover dough and continue to cut out cookies. Bake each sheet for 10 minutes. The cookies are done when the edges begin to turn golden. Remove from oven and let cool completely on a wire rack. To assemble, spread a small amount of jam on a cookie and sandwich with another one.
Chocolate Ganache
89 g (3 oz) dark chocolate
89 g (3 oz) heavy cream
1 Tbsp butter (cut in 4 pieces)
Place chocolate chips in a bowl.
Pour the cream into a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer, remove from heat, and pour on top of the chocolate. Let sit for a minute, and then whisk in the butter in until smooth.
Dip the cookies in the chocolate ganache, shaking gently to remove the excess, and let dry on a sheet of parchment paper for at least 2 hours until the ganache has firmed up and is no longer liquid.
Total Time: About 3 hours (if you place the dough in the fridge and the dipped cookies in the fridge to harden)
Sidenote, that has nothing to do with these cookies: I’m hoping to get on a better schedule of baking things for this blog, but I just started a new job at a bakery and I’m still adjusting to the hours (yeah night shift!) and I’m moving soon. Thank you to everyone who follows this blog, you’re awesome and please like the facebook page when you have a chance. View Larger


Shortbread cookies are so wonderful because they are so simple.

I like shortbread cookies as they are, but every once in a while I like to dress them up. They do dress up so nicely.

I rarely make shortbread cookies because the process of rolling and stamping can be so boring. Especially the stamping. So deciding to make these cookies is a bit odd. Especially since these cookies are so small, so you’re stamping out cookies for a while. I’m not sure if you can tell from the picture, but the cookies are the size of your thumb.

I changed a couple things in this recipe. I added vanilla bean seeds to the cookies, I used a smaller cookie cutter and I baked the cookies for only 10 minutes (due to how small they were).

If you don’t have time to wait for the dough to cool in the fridge, place it in the freezer for 30 minutes instead. You can also do the same to harden up the chocolate on the cookies after you dip them.

I used some cherry blueberry jam that I got at a food exchange in between the cookies. I think that raspberry jam would be nice too.

Chocolate Dipped Jam Sandwich Cookies

1 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

2 cups (280 g) all purpose flour

12 Tbsp butter, softened

1/4 cup (50 g) sugar

1/4 cup (28 gr) powdered sugar

1 egg

Seeds scrapped from 4 vanilla beans

jam or marmalade

Whisk together the baking powder, salt, vanilla bean seeds and flour in a bowl. Set aside.  In a mixer bowl, cream 12 Tbsp of butter for 2 – 3 minutes until light and fluffy and then slowly add the sugar and powdered sugar and continue to beat for a few more minutes. Add the egg one and beat in well. Slowly add in the flour mixture in three stages, mixing just until combined. Turn the dough out onto a work surface and form into disk. Wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 350˚ F.

Prepare baking sheets lined with parchment paper. Roll out the cold dough on a lightly floured surface to a 1/2 inch thickness. Using a 1 inch cookie cutter (or whatever size you like), cut out small rounds. Re-roll the leftover dough and continue to cut out cookies. Bake each sheet for 10 minutes. The cookies are done when the edges begin to turn golden. Remove from oven and let cool completely on a wire rack. To assemble, spread a small amount of jam on a cookie and sandwich with another one.

Chocolate Ganache

89 g (3 oz) dark chocolate

89 g (3 oz) heavy cream

1 Tbsp butter (cut in 4 pieces)

Place chocolate chips in a bowl.

Pour the cream into a small saucepan over medium heat. Bring to a simmer, remove from heat, and pour on top of the chocolate. Let sit for a minute, and then whisk in the butter in until smooth.

Dip the cookies in the chocolate ganache, shaking gently to remove the excess, and let dry on a sheet of parchment paper for at least 2 hours until the ganache has firmed up and is no longer liquid.

Total Time: About 3 hours (if you place the dough in the fridge and the dipped cookies in the fridge to harden)

Sidenote, that has nothing to do with these cookies: I’m hoping to get on a better schedule of baking things for this blog, but I just started a new job at a bakery and I’m still adjusting to the hours (yeah night shift!) and I’m moving soon. Thank you to everyone who follows this blog, you’re awesome and please like the facebook page when you have a chance.

June 17, 2012 @ 5:41 AM 7 notes

I love coffee.
I drink about 2-3 cups of coffee a day. I’m a purist though, I don’t like adding all the syrups and flavors. Just a cup of coffee with some sugar and a little bit of milk for me. I did make an exception for these cupcakes though…
I had a bunch of eggs in my fridge I needed to use before they went bad. Usually, I go through eggs really fast. I bake something about every other day (usually a recipe I’m still trying to perfect). However, last week I was really busy with interviews (I have a new job!!) and getting my pretzel class together so I didn’t have time to bake as much.
And the eggs just sat there.
Yesterday was my first day I was able to sit back and just breathe, so some baking was in order.
I looked through recipes I had bookmarked on foodgawker and found this one. Although these cupcakes don’t have the nice dome shape, they are still light and fluffy and the hazelnuts and coffee bits give them a nice little crunch.
I changed a lot in this recipe. I used finely ground coffee instead of instant coffee, added more hazelnuts, an egg yolk (to offset the addition of more dry ingredients) and some vanilla extract.
Coffee Hazelnut Cupcakes with Chocolate Ganache 
Cupcakes
100g soft butter
220g sugar
3 eggs and 1 egg yolk
190g flour, sifted
2 teaspoons baking powder
40g hazelnuts
2 tablespoons finely ground coffee
 2 teaspoons vanilla
 Preheat the oven to 340 degrees F.
Whip butter until fluffy and then add the eggs one at a time until they are incorporated. Grind hazelnuts in a food processor with 1 tablespoon of the flour (otherwise you will get hazelnut butter) until they are finely ground and in separate bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, ground nuts and coffee in a bowl.
Mix the wet and dry ingredients together until the batter is smooth and free of lumps. Pour the mixture into cupcake pan filling only 3/4 of each cup at most.
Cook for about 25 minutes, or until the cupcakes spring back to the touch. When they are ready, leave them to cool on a wire rack.
Chocolate Ganache
150g dark chocolate
125ml heavy cream
a few coffee beans to decorate (optional)
Prepare the chocolate ganache by melting the chocolate on low heat, stirring occasionally and mix in the cream. Let stand 10 minutes before spreading over the cooled cakes.
Place a coffee bean on the center of each cupcake as decoration.
Total Time: About an hour View Larger

I love coffee.

I drink about 2-3 cups of coffee a day. I’m a purist though, I don’t like adding all the syrups and flavors. Just a cup of coffee with some sugar and a little bit of milk for me. I did make an exception for these cupcakes though…

I had a bunch of eggs in my fridge I needed to use before they went bad. Usually, I go through eggs really fast. I bake something about every other day (usually a recipe I’m still trying to perfect). However, last week I was really busy with interviews (I have a new job!!) and getting my pretzel class together so I didn’t have time to bake as much.

And the eggs just sat there.

Yesterday was my first day I was able to sit back and just breathe, so some baking was in order.

I looked through recipes I had bookmarked on foodgawker and found this one. Although these cupcakes don’t have the nice dome shape, they are still light and fluffy and the hazelnuts and coffee bits give them a nice little crunch.

I changed a lot in this recipe. I used finely ground coffee instead of instant coffee, added more hazelnuts, an egg yolk (to offset the addition of more dry ingredients) and some vanilla extract.

Coffee Hazelnut Cupcakes with Chocolate Ganache

Cupcakes

100g soft butter

220g sugar

3 eggs and 1 egg yolk

190g flour, sifted

2 teaspoons baking powder

40g hazelnuts

2 tablespoons finely ground coffee

 2 teaspoons vanilla


Preheat the oven to 340 degrees F.

Whip butter until fluffy and then add the eggs one at a time until they are incorporated. Grind hazelnuts in a food processor with 1 tablespoon of the flour (otherwise you will get hazelnut butter) until they are finely ground and in separate bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, ground nuts and coffee in a bowl.

Mix the wet and dry ingredients together until the batter is smooth and free of lumps. Pour the mixture into cupcake pan filling only 3/4 of each cup at most.

Cook for about 25 minutes, or until the cupcakes spring back to the touch. When they are ready, leave them to cool on a wire rack.

Chocolate Ganache

150g dark chocolate

125ml heavy cream

a few coffee beans to decorate (optional)

Prepare the chocolate ganache by melting the chocolate on low heat, stirring occasionally and mix in the cream. Let stand 10 minutes before spreading over the cooled cakes.

Place a coffee bean on the center of each cupcake as decoration.

Total Time: About an hour

May 29, 2012 @ 3:16 PM 1 note