The Bread is in the Baking

Rikki Wynn - Baker and actor, currently living in Portland, OR.

If you like what you see please follow and like my blog on facebook.

Question or comments about the cooking?

Hello, lovely wonderful followers.

Thank you so much for sticking with me through the spell of no posts. I wish I was posting to say that this was going to change… but it probably won’t. I’ll try to start posting recipes at least once a month soon, but my new job makes it a little hard because a lot of the recipes I would post here are now being used in the restaurant.

After getting back from Ireland (check the post before this one for the travel blog), I immediately got a job working at Bridgeport Brewery! I am now one of two bakers for the brewpub. I help make most of the bread served in the restaurant and get to make (almost) whatever I want for the dessert menu. It’s honestly the best job I’ve ever had. I feel like I’m learning a lot here and I get to work with some amazing people.

These pictures are of just a few things I’ve made since I started a little over two months ago:

1. Carrot, walnut and coconut cake with cream cheese icing

2. Fresh strawberry tart with vanilla pastry cream and rhubarb glaze

3. Coconut macaroons

4. Vanilla almond cake with blackberry jam center and brown sugar buttermilk swiss buttercream

5. Chocolate cake with chocolate chips and chocolate swiss buttercream

6. Strawberry Rhubarb ramekin pies

7. Strawberry rhubarb and blueberry basil mini flag pies (this recipe is actually on my blog here from last summer)

8. Como loafs

July 7, 2014 @ 10:34 PM 3 notes

Apple butter is one of my favorite spreads.
It’s actually one of my favorite foods. It’s thick and creamy and tastes like fall.
I’ve been wanting to make apple butter for a really long time now, but it’s hard to find a recipe that doesn’t call for a slow cooker or a food mill. Seeing as I don’t have either, I’d been putting it off. Finally I came to the conclusion that I would just have to come up with my own recipe because I couldn’t let these things hold me back.
I looked at a bunch of different recipes to come up with this one and realized that apple butter is just apple sauce that’s been cooked longer, so there is less liquid in it.
Words of warning, because I am not using a slow cooker you have to hang out in your kitchen the entire time, which is 5 hours. So I hope you have a good book to read while you wait! Or you could bake something else too! That’s what I did.
Apple Butter
(Makes about 5 pints)
4 pounds of apples, cored and chopped up (I left the skins on too)
1 cup of honey
2 cups of water
1/2 tsp cloves
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tbs vanilla
1 tsp of salt
Juice from one small lemon
Put everything in a pot and place on the stove on medium heat. Keep the pot covered with lid and stir the apples occasionally to make sure they don’t stick to the bottom of your pot. Once the apple pieces have begun to fall apart, uncover the pot and let it continue to cook, stirring occasionally. Keep the heat below medium and make sure the apple butter does not boil, so it’s less likely to burn. Once the mixture begins to look smooth, take off the heat and move a hand blender through the pot so that the whole mixture is smooth. Place the pot back on the stove and continue to cook until the apple butter is thick and your spoon leaves “waves” as it moves through it.
At this point you can can it, or just put it in jars in your fridge. I would tell you how to can it… but my canning was pretty unsuccessful. Only one of my jars sealed. So if you would like to can your apple butter check out this site. They look pretty knowledgeable about canning.
Or ask your grandmother?
Total Time: About 4 hours View Larger

Apple butter is one of my favorite spreads.

It’s actually one of my favorite foods. It’s thick and creamy and tastes like fall.

I’ve been wanting to make apple butter for a really long time now, but it’s hard to find a recipe that doesn’t call for a slow cooker or a food mill. Seeing as I don’t have either, I’d been putting it off. Finally I came to the conclusion that I would just have to come up with my own recipe because I couldn’t let these things hold me back.

I looked at a bunch of different recipes to come up with this one and realized that apple butter is just apple sauce that’s been cooked longer, so there is less liquid in it.

Words of warning, because I am not using a slow cooker you have to hang out in your kitchen the entire time, which is 5 hours. So I hope you have a good book to read while you wait! Or you could bake something else too! That’s what I did.

Apple Butter

(Makes about 5 pints)

4 pounds of apples, cored and chopped up (I left the skins on too)

1 cup of honey

2 cups of water

1/2 tsp cloves

1/2 tsp nutmeg

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tbs vanilla

1 tsp of salt

Juice from one small lemon

Put everything in a pot and place on the stove on medium heat. Keep the pot covered with lid and stir the apples occasionally to make sure they don’t stick to the bottom of your pot. Once the apple pieces have begun to fall apart, uncover the pot and let it continue to cook, stirring occasionally. Keep the heat below medium and make sure the apple butter does not boil, so it’s less likely to burn. Once the mixture begins to look smooth, take off the heat and move a hand blender through the pot so that the whole mixture is smooth. Place the pot back on the stove and continue to cook until the apple butter is thick and your spoon leaves “waves” as it moves through it.

At this point you can can it, or just put it in jars in your fridge. I would tell you how to can it… but my canning was pretty unsuccessful. Only one of my jars sealed. So if you would like to can your apple butter check out this site. They look pretty knowledgeable about canning.

Or ask your grandmother?

Total Time: About 4 hours

October 18, 2012 @ 8:34 PM 10 notes

I’ve had rugelach on occasion. Not very often though.
Usually I’ll have one when I’m in Chicago visiting my dad’s side of the family. It reminds me of real deli’s. Deli’s we don’t have in the NW. It is flaky and rich and light while still full of flavor. I remember when I was little, we would buy them at the counter of this one deli/restaurant, Max’s, that we would always go to when we’d visit Chicago. They have the most amazing matzo ball soup.
We’d touch down in the O’Hare airport and my sisters and I would beg to go to Max’s for the Matzo ball soup.
The last time I was in Chicago I stayed with one of my cousins and she told me that we were not going to Max’s because my family always wants to go there and that there were other places besides Max’s to eat in Chicago. I laughed because in my head Max’s is the only place to eat in Chicago.
But anyway, rugelach.
One of my friends wanted to make rugelach. I’d never made it before, but I’m always up for trying a new recipe. Rugelach are really easy to make and don’t take too long. We had a lot of fun rolling out the dough and then rolling up all the little rugelach.
A couple weeks ago my boss had given me a a jar of vanilla peach jam she had made so we used it as the filling and I added lemon zest to the dough.
This recipe is from a wonderful Jewish cookbook my mom gave me: Jewish Cooking in America by Joan Nathan.
Vanilla Peach Rugelach
Dough
2 cups flour
8 ounces cream cheese
2 sticks (1 cup) cold unsalted butter
1/2 confectioners sugar
Pinch of salt
1/2 tsp lemon juice
1/2 tsp lemon zest
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
Filling
1 cup peach jam
3/4 walnuts, chopped into small pieces
Garnish
1 egg
1/4 cup raw (or granulated) sugar
Cut the butter and cream cheese into small even pieces. Mix all the ingredients for the dough together in a standard mixer until a soft dough has formed. Flatten the dough into a disk and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.
Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.
Cut the dough into 4 pieces and roll each piece into a round disk that is about 1/8 inch thick. Spread the peach jam evenly in a thin layer over the whole disk and sprinkle the walnut pieces over the jam. Cut the disk, like a pizza, into triangles with the wide side of the dough being about an inch thick. Roll each piece inwards toward the center of the disk and place the cookies on a baking sheet covered in parchment, leaving about 1/4 inch between each cookie.
Beat the egg and brush each cookie with egg. Sprinkle sugar evenly over the cookies and place the tray in the over for 25 minutes, or until golden brown.
Enjoy!
Total Time: About 2 hours View Larger

I’ve had rugelach on occasion. Not very often though.

Usually I’ll have one when I’m in Chicago visiting my dad’s side of the family. It reminds me of real deli’s. Deli’s we don’t have in the NW. It is flaky and rich and light while still full of flavor. I remember when I was little, we would buy them at the counter of this one deli/restaurant, Max’s, that we would always go to when we’d visit Chicago. They have the most amazing matzo ball soup.

We’d touch down in the O’Hare airport and my sisters and I would beg to go to Max’s for the Matzo ball soup.

The last time I was in Chicago I stayed with one of my cousins and she told me that we were not going to Max’s because my family always wants to go there and that there were other places besides Max’s to eat in Chicago. I laughed because in my head Max’s is the only place to eat in Chicago.

But anyway, rugelach.

One of my friends wanted to make rugelach. I’d never made it before, but I’m always up for trying a new recipe. Rugelach are really easy to make and don’t take too long. We had a lot of fun rolling out the dough and then rolling up all the little rugelach.

A couple weeks ago my boss had given me a a jar of vanilla peach jam she had made so we used it as the filling and I added lemon zest to the dough.

This recipe is from a wonderful Jewish cookbook my mom gave me: Jewish Cooking in America by Joan Nathan.

Vanilla Peach Rugelach

Dough

2 cups flour

8 ounces cream cheese

2 sticks (1 cup) cold unsalted butter

1/2 confectioners sugar

Pinch of salt

1/2 tsp lemon juice

1/2 tsp lemon zest

1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Filling

1 cup peach jam

3/4 walnuts, chopped into small pieces

Garnish

1 egg

1/4 cup raw (or granulated) sugar

Cut the butter and cream cheese into small even pieces. Mix all the ingredients for the dough together in a standard mixer until a soft dough has formed. Flatten the dough into a disk and wrap the dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate the dough for at least one hour.

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

Cut the dough into 4 pieces and roll each piece into a round disk that is about 1/8 inch thick. Spread the peach jam evenly in a thin layer over the whole disk and sprinkle the walnut pieces over the jam. Cut the disk, like a pizza, into triangles with the wide side of the dough being about an inch thick. Roll each piece inwards toward the center of the disk and place the cookies on a baking sheet covered in parchment, leaving about 1/4 inch between each cookie.

Beat the egg and brush each cookie with egg. Sprinkle sugar evenly over the cookies and place the tray in the over for 25 minutes, or until golden brown.

Enjoy!

Total Time: About 2 hours

September 13, 2012 @ 8:59 PM 2 notes

Growing up, my twin sister and I got into a scone frenzy.
This kind of thing happened occasionally. We got into this funk where we had to make one particular type of food over and over and over. Luckily, this did include variations of the food. Our scone frenzy included a small scone book which we went through and bookmarked all the recipes we wanted to try. I wish I remembered the name of it, the cookbook was small with violets all over the book sleeve and a teatime set up on the front.
After making all those scones my favorite scones are still Raspberry scones. You can never go wrong with too many raspberries. I like my scones crunchy on the outside and soft and airy, but still a bit flaky on the inside so these scones came out perfect. I changed the recipe a bit… I had Greek yogurt in my fridge but no whole milk and when in doubt ALWAYS substitute yogurt for cream. In my scone excitement I also forgot to put in almond slices which would have been a very good addition. I finally got to use the vanilla extract I made and oh my lord! It is so good.
Greek Yogurt and Vanilla Raspberry Scones
2 cups flour
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp baking soda
1/4 tsp salt
8 tbs (1 stick) butter cut into small pieces
1/2 cup Greek yogurt
1 large egg
1 tsp vanilla
1/4 cup frozen or fresh raspberries
Preheat the oven to 400 f degrees
In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Cut in cold butter till it resembles small pebbles. In a separate bowl, beat the egg, vanilla and Greek yogurt together. Pour the wet mixture over the dry mixture and stir together until it is just combined and the dough has formed a ball. If the dough seems a bit too dry, add a little bit more yogurt or some milk.
Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Dust your hands with some flour and pick up the ball of dough. Pat it into a thick disk on the parchment paper and cut the scones into 8-10 scones like you would a pizza. Gently separate the scones from the disk so there is space between the scones and they won’t get stuck together when they bake.
Push your thumb into the fattest part of each scone and place a couple of raspberries in each hole.
Sprinkle the scones with sugar and place in the oven for 15-17 minutes or until a light golden brown.
Total Time: About 40 minutes View Larger

Growing up, my twin sister and I got into a scone frenzy.

This kind of thing happened occasionally. We got into this funk where we had to make one particular type of food over and over and over. Luckily, this did include variations of the food. Our scone frenzy included a small scone book which we went through and bookmarked all the recipes we wanted to try. I wish I remembered the name of it, the cookbook was small with violets all over the book sleeve and a teatime set up on the front.

After making all those scones my favorite scones are still Raspberry scones. You can never go wrong with too many raspberries. I like my scones crunchy on the outside and soft and airy, but still a bit flaky on the inside so these scones came out perfect. I changed the recipe a bit… I had Greek yogurt in my fridge but no whole milk and when in doubt ALWAYS substitute yogurt for cream. In my scone excitement I also forgot to put in almond slices which would have been a very good addition. I finally got to use the vanilla extract I made and oh my lord! It is so good.

Greek Yogurt and Vanilla Raspberry Scones

2 cups flour

1/4 cup sugar

1 1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp baking soda

1/4 tsp salt

8 tbs (1 stick) butter cut into small pieces

1/2 cup Greek yogurt

1 large egg

1 tsp vanilla

1/4 cup frozen or fresh raspberries

Preheat the oven to 400 f degrees

In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Cut in cold butter till it resembles small pebbles. In a separate bowl, beat the egg, vanilla and Greek yogurt together. Pour the wet mixture over the dry mixture and stir together until it is just combined and the dough has formed a ball. If the dough seems a bit too dry, add a little bit more yogurt or some milk.

Cover a baking sheet with parchment paper. Dust your hands with some flour and pick up the ball of dough. Pat it into a thick disk on the parchment paper and cut the scones into 8-10 scones like you would a pizza. Gently separate the scones from the disk so there is space between the scones and they won’t get stuck together when they bake.

Push your thumb into the fattest part of each scone and place a couple of raspberries in each hole.

Sprinkle the scones with sugar and place in the oven for 15-17 minutes or until a light golden brown.

Total Time: About 40 minutes

March 18, 2012 @ 3:34 PM 5 notes

I found this adorable mini Bundt cake pan at goodwill the other day.
And I just knew that I would make cakes this week. It just had to happen.
This makes 12 miniature cakes that are so cute. I chose to try a lemon olive oil Bundt cake recipe that I found on foodgawkr. I love olive oil cakes - the crumb is so smooth. I didn’t change the recipe, but I halved the glaze - it just seemed a bit excessive and the cake tastes great with or without it.
The only worry I had was that the pan is old and the cakes would get stuck in the pan. Putting all the time into making a cake and then to have it break a part on you is the worst. So make sure to grease your pan really well and be patient when they come out of the oven.
Mini Lemon Olive Oil Cakes
Cakes
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt
1 1/3 cups sugar
2 tablespoons grated lemon zest (2 to 4 lemons depending on size)
2 large eggs, room temperature
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2/3 cup milk
Glaze and Garnish
1 1/2 cups confectioners sugar, sifted
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
Heat the oven to 350 degrees with the rack in the middle position. Brush a 12-cup mini Bundt pan with melted butter and dust it with flour, shaking out any excess flour.
In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside.
In a whisk the sugar and lemon zest together until combined and add the eggs in one at a time, then gradually pour in the olive oil and milk, until the batter is smooth.
Add the flour mixture to wet ingredients in two batches, until just combined both times. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, filling each cup only 3/4 of the way full. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the cakes start pulling away from the sides of the pan and spring back when touched. Cool for 10 minutes in the pan before inverting them onto a rack to cool completely.
Make the glaze by whisking together the confectioners sugar, lemon juice and melted butter—if you find that the glaze is still too thick to work with, add more lemon juice or water until you get the right consistency. Coat each of the cakes with glaze.
Total Time: About 45 minutes View Larger

I found this adorable mini Bundt cake pan at goodwill the other day.

And I just knew that I would make cakes this week. It just had to happen.

This makes 12 miniature cakes that are so cute. I chose to try a lemon olive oil Bundt cake recipe that I found on foodgawkr. I love olive oil cakes - the crumb is so smooth. I didn’t change the recipe, but I halved the glaze - it just seemed a bit excessive and the cake tastes great with or without it.

The only worry I had was that the pan is old and the cakes would get stuck in the pan. Putting all the time into making a cake and then to have it break a part on you is the worst. So make sure to grease your pan really well and be patient when they come out of the oven.

Mini Lemon Olive Oil Cakes

Cakes

1 cup all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon fine grain sea salt

1 1/3 cups sugar

2 tablespoons grated lemon zest (2 to 4 lemons depending on size)

2 large eggs, room temperature

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2/3 cup milk

Glaze and Garnish

1 1/2 cups confectioners sugar, sifted

3 tablespoons lemon juice

1 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted

Heat the oven to 350 degrees with the rack in the middle position. Brush a 12-cup mini Bundt pan with melted butter and dust it with flour, shaking out any excess flour.

In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, baking powder, and salt and set aside.

In a whisk the sugar and lemon zest together until combined and add the eggs in one at a time, then gradually pour in the olive oil and milk, until the batter is smooth.

Add the flour mixture to wet ingredients in two batches, until just combined both times. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, filling each cup only 3/4 of the way full. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes until the cakes start pulling away from the sides of the pan and spring back when touched. Cool for 10 minutes in the pan before inverting them onto a rack to cool completely.

Make the glaze by whisking together the confectioners sugar, lemon juice and melted butter—if you find that the glaze is still too thick to work with, add more lemon juice or water until you get the right consistency. Coat each of the cakes with glaze.

Total Time: About 45 minutes

March 13, 2012 @ 2:00 AM 4 notes

Do you know how easy making lemon bars is?
The answer is incredibly easy, as long as you don’t have any cuts on your hands, because lemon zest in cuts… it stings and will make squeezing lemons a lot slower.
Now, I love lemon bars, who doesn’t? And these are the best, the crust is good the lemon is sweet and zesty. I’ve made this recipe a bunch for parties. I used a recipe from the blog In Erika’s Kitchen, this recipe is almost the same, I just added lemon zest for a bit of a tarter taste. If you decide to make this for a party I suggest you double or triple the recipe. 
Lemon Bars  
1 1/8 cups   all-purpose flour
divided 1/2 cup   powdered sugar (and an extra 2 tablespoons to shake over the bars)
1/2 cup (1 stick)   butter, melted 
Pinch of   salt 
2   eggs 
1 cup   granulated sugar 
1/2 tsp   baking powder 
1/3 cup   fresh lemon juice (about 2-3 lemons)
1 Tbs lemon zest (or to taste)Preheat  the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9x9-inch pan with baking spray or line the pan with parchment paper. In   a bowl, mix together 1 cup of the flour, 1/2 cup of the powdered  sugar,  the melted butter, and the salt with a fork until a crumbly  dough  forms. Press the dough into the prepared pan so it covers the  bottom and  goes about 1/2 inch up the sides. Bake the crust about 15  minutes or  until it just starts to turn golden.  
While   the crust is baking, whisk together the remaining 1/8 cup flour, eggs,   granulated sugar, baking powder and lemon zest and juice. 
Quick note on lemon zest: the zest is the skin, but NOT the white part. Let me repeat that: YOU DO NOT WANT THE WHITE PART (also known as the pith), THE WHITE PART IS BITTER. Bitter is bad, tart is good. There’s a difference, trust me on this. So when you go to grate the lemon zest (use a fine grater) stop when you see white. If you get a little of the pith in your zesting quest, don’t worry, you just don’t want a lot.
Pull the crust out of  the oven, pour over the lemon mixture, and return  the pan to the oven  for another 30 minutes, or until the center no  longer jiggles when you  shake the pan. Cool   the lemon bars in the pan for half an hour, then refrigerate at least   two hours before cutting. Cut with a large knife  into 9 even squares,  like a tic-tac-toe board. Dust the lemon bars with  the 2 Tbsp powdered  sugar before serving.
Total time: 55 mins (with refrigeration 3 hours)(Picture taken by Eddie Barksdale) View Larger

Do you know how easy making lemon bars is?

The answer is incredibly easy, as long as you don’t have any cuts on your hands, because lemon zest in cuts… it stings and will make squeezing lemons a lot slower.

Now, I love lemon bars, who doesn’t? And these are the best, the crust is good the lemon is sweet and zesty. I’ve made this recipe a bunch for parties. I used a recipe from the blog In Erika’s Kitchen, this recipe is almost the same, I just added lemon zest for a bit of a tarter taste.

If you decide to make this for a party I suggest you double or triple the recipe.

Lemon Bars 

1 1/8 cups all-purpose flour

divided 1/2 cup powdered sugar (and an extra 2 tablespoons to shake over the bars)

1/2 cup (1 stick) butter, melted 

Pinch of salt 

eggs 

1 cup granulated sugar 

1/2 tsp baking powder 

1/3 cup fresh lemon juice (about 2-3 lemons)

1 Tbs lemon zest (or to taste)

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray a 9x9-inch pan with baking spray or line the pan with parchment paper. In a bowl, mix together 1 cup of the flour, 1/2 cup of the powdered sugar, the melted butter, and the salt with a fork until a crumbly dough forms. Press the dough into the prepared pan so it covers the bottom and goes about 1/2 inch up the sides. Bake the crust about 15 minutes or until it just starts to turn golden.  

While the crust is baking, whisk together the remaining 1/8 cup flour, eggs, granulated sugar, baking powder and lemon zest and juice.

Quick note on lemon zest: the zest is the skin, but NOT the white part. Let me repeat that: YOU DO NOT WANT THE WHITE PART (also known as the pith), THE WHITE PART IS BITTER. Bitter is bad, tart is good. There’s a difference, trust me on this. So when you go to grate the lemon zest (use a fine grater) stop when you see white. If you get a little of the pith in your zesting quest, don’t worry, you just don’t want a lot.

Pull the crust out of the oven, pour over the lemon mixture, and return the pan to the oven for another 30 minutes, or until the center no longer jiggles when you shake the pan. Cool the lemon bars in the pan for half an hour, then refrigerate at least two hours before cutting. Cut with a large knife into 9 even squares, like a tic-tac-toe board. Dust the lemon bars with the 2 Tbsp powdered sugar before serving.

Total time: 55 mins (with refrigeration 3 hours)
(Picture taken by Eddie Barksdale)

October 23, 2011 @ 4:49 PM 20 notes